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Being a green card holder, the last place Peter Ajak expected to find himself was in immigration detention for a crime he did not commit, at the mercy the judge who delayed reviewing evidence that would exonerate him. Peter was a refugee; separated from his parents during civil war, he was a Lost Boy of South Sudan. After being relocated to the U.S. he soon learned that American high schools could also be war zones. Starting 9th grade at 16-years-old Peter was ostracized, teased, and humiliated by his classmates. Many times in school and later during his 8 months in immigration detention he yearned for the camaraderie of his group of Lost Boy brothers who, even in the midst of the terrors of war, could provide comfort and strength against the chaos of life.
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Ariana Lindquist
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4200x2800 / 4.3MB
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USA: IMMIGRATION
Being a green card holder, the last place Peter Ajak expected to find himself was in immigration detention for a crime he did not commit, at the mercy the judge who delayed reviewing evidence that would exonerate him. Peter was a refugee; separated from his parents during civil war, he was a Lost Boy of South Sudan. After being relocated to the U.S. he soon learned that American high schools could also be war zones. Starting 9th grade at 16-years-old Peter was ostracized, teased, and humiliated by his classmates. Many times in school and later during his 8 months in immigration detention he yearned for the camaraderie of his group of Lost Boy brothers who, even in the midst of the terrors of war, could provide comfort and strength against the chaos of life.